Archive for the ‘Employment and Worklife’ Category

Social Media in the Workplace

May 4th, 2016

What is considered acceptable use of social media in the modern workplace? How can what you post on social media both in and out of the office be used against you?

Although in many cases U.S. laws and regulations have not kept pace with all the latest developments, legislators and employment specialists have become increasingly aware of the issues. Facebook has over one billion users, with Twitter boasting around 500 million – and LinkedIn around half that.

Understandably, many employers were reported as having noted this tendency with some degree of alarm, voicing fears such as reduced productivity, adverse publicity and a possible trend in work-related claims and liability. Some have wondered about their rights to ban social media usage in the workplace – yet these same employers have seen their levels of businesses grow in many cases due to social media’s innate ability to market products and services to new customers. Companies also hire bloggers, endorsers or community managers to take advantage of the phenomenon.

In addition, employee morale is usually higher with access. What is clear, however, is that social media policies are just as important an area as any other (such as vacations, special leave and anti-discrimination) in contracts of employment and the general relationships between employers and employees.

As social media developed, some government agencies began issuing guidance. While some of this has been based on common sense and an intuitive approach, other examples have been less so. Specifically, some NLRB (National Labor Relations Board) pronouncements on the subject have been viewed as self-contradictory and confusing. The NLRB has received most of its press attention for supporting the employee right of engaging in concerted activities. Here, one key test is whether any one employer policy would reasonably have the effect of distressing employees; such clauses are deemed invalid in employment contracts. The Equal Employment Opportunities Commission (EEC) has also taken an interest in the question. Read the rest of this entry »

Company Relocation: Relocating People and Employees

August 17th, 2015

When a large corporation relocates to a new city or state due to needing larger business premises, a change in ownership or acquisition by another company, one of the most important aspects of the move will be planning the relocation of people and employees.

For the sake of fluidity and flexibility, relocation of employees should be planned well in advance of the actual relocation date. This is particularly important if the type of business is one that has an ongoing hourly process or production schedule.

As an example, an accounting business that processes client data on an hourly basis would need a relocation plan of action that insures the fastest move to the new location. In this type of production, a computer network expert should be a member of the relocation team to insure no serious disruption or breaches of data processing occurs. There is also a measure of expedient security of data to protect that should also be considered.

When moving to a new office or site, the move needs to be expedient, efficient and without data processing disruption. Relocation will need to be accomplished on a department by department basis, with planning down to the smallest detail of floor plans for computer networked equipment, as well as systems experts to disable and restart the systems. Computers were removed and reinstalled in a finely designed, almost military, regimental style.

Legalities and Best Practices for Relocating People and Employees

For large office relocation, there may be certain legalities with regard to relocating employees. These may be related to providing adequate information for housing and educational facilities for employees with spouses and children.

It’s up to the business owners to follow state guidelines on responsibility to employees regarding notification of relocation and advice on changes to employee tax status for out of state relocation.

Best practices for relocating people and employees is to consider engaging a professional relocation specialist with experience in business relocation. This may include a general personnel or high level management recruiter to assist employees who will not be relocating to the new site to find employment. Read the rest of this entry »

International Women’s Day: an Opportunity to Recognize Achievements of Women in the Labor Force

March 8th, 2015

March 8, 2015 International Womens Day

International Women’s Day on March 8 is an opportunity to recognize the achievements of women in the labor force. It is also a time to reflect on challenges women have and continue to face, including celebrating the achievements of women who have played important roles in advancing equality for women at work.

The role of women in the labor force in the United States has evolved greatly since the end of World War II. After the War, less than a third of women were active in the U.S. labor force. While women became an increasingly important participant in the labour force during the war, their role increased significantly in the following decades. The number of women working began to increase rapidly from the 1960s to the 1980s, and reached its peak in 1999 when 60 percent of women were active in the labour force according to statistics from the U.S. Department of Labor. In 2013, the percentage of women in the labour force was 57.2 percent.

At the same time, women traditionally faced challenges in the labour force including wage inequality and low representation in leadership roles when compared to men. The gap is narrowing, although more work is needed to ensure true equity in the workplace. In addition to a general increasing trend in the participation rate of women in the labor force, the wage and education gap of women in the labor force is narrowing when compared to their male colleagues. The proportion of women in the labor force with a college degree more than tripled between 1970 and 2013 according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Earnings of female workers as a proportion of earnings of their male counterparts have also grown. In 1979, women who worked full time earned just 62 percent of what men earned. In 2013, this figure was 82 percent.

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The Importance of Taking the Weekend Off

August 20th, 2014

Working too much has the potential to give a person unnecessary anxiety and stress. If you never take time for yourself on the weekends, you run the risk of depression, weight gain, anxiety and even a heart attack. Many industries are beginning to recognize the importance of promoting “work-free weekends.” A recently published Slate article indicated that even the investment banking industry has instituted work-free weekends for employees due to the manner in which they promote a worker’s health and productivity.

Promoting Productivity in the Office

Those who continuously work and fail to take time off of work are likely to suffer from burn out from their jobs. A two-day weekend gives a worker the chance to get away from his or her office responsibilities and recharge the batteries. After spending a weekend away from work, an employee can feel renewed and refreshed on Monday morning. An employee is able to focus on the task at hand and has increased levels of concentration.

Getting the Exercise You Need

The weekend gives many employees the opportunity to get in a good workout. During the week, some workers may find that it is nearly impossible to get to the gym. The weekend provides an employee with an uninterrupted period of time in which he or she can work out for hours at a time. Those who have to sit for extended periods of time may find that the weekend provides a welcome break from sedentary habits. Sitting for extended periods of time has been linked to serious health issues like heart attacks, death and cancer. Read the rest of this entry »

The Top Ten Favourite Cities to Work in

June 12th, 2014

Looking for a new job provides you with the opportunity for a fresh start in many ways. You can choose a job based upon a location in which you know you will be happy. You can also search for jobs based on salary, lifetime earning potential, benefits, prestige, work experience and office culture. However, you may want to make the location of your job one of the priorities in your job search. If you choose a location in which you can happily live, work and play, you will be less likely to suffer from job burnout or dissatisfaction in the long run. Whether you are looking for a change of scenery or want to live in an area with a thriving economy, here are ten U.S. cities that should be on your list.

1. Dallas, Texas

Kiplinger ranks Dallas, Texas, as a top place for new graduates to live and work. The median salary for college grads is about $42,900 a year, and the average apartment rent is $799 a month. About 6.3 million people live in Dallas, and the unemployment rate in the area is only 6.3 percent.

2. Washington, D.C.

Washington D.C. is an excellent place for millenials to work, live and play. The city is thriving with job opportunities in the political and corporate worlds. The median salary for college graduates is about $46,100 a year. When you live in D.C., you won’t have to worry about saving funds for an entertainment budget. Many attractions, such as national museums and the National Zoo, are free of cost.

3. Minneapolis, Minnesota

Minneapolis is quickly turning into a popular city for workers due to its low cost of living, low rent costs, smoke-free regulations, gorgeous parks and beautiful lakes. Individuals can enjoy living in a metropolitan city and also have access to natural settings on the weekend.

4. Denver, Colorado

The downtown area of Denver is a major attraction for workers. The city-wide bike sharing program can help you cut costs on transportation. Denver also has plenty of restaurants, shops, casinos and nightlife attractions for your time off. You also won’t have a problem finding a great craft brew in the city, as Denver features many pubs and bars that have been instrumental in creating craft brews.

5. Boston, Massachusetts

Boston is known for being a center of business, finance, politics, shopping, theatre and great restaurants. The city is booming with job opportunities. With attractions like the Boston Marathon and major athletic events, you will always have something to do after work hours in Boston.

6. Anchorage, Alaska

Anchorage is becoming an attractive spot for job seekers due to its high median income of $47,600 and low rent costs. Alaska also does not feature a state income or sales tax. After work, you may enjoy activities like fishing, snowboarding and touring glaciers in the region.

7. Houston, Texas

A promising job market is a major attraction for those seeking a new career in Houston. Home values are also expected to increase in the upcoming years, and individuals can find homes for sale at competitive prices in Houston.

8. Ann Arbor, Michigan

Home to the University of Michigan, individuals can enjoy living in a city that is thriving with culture and things to do. New grads and job seekers can find high-paying jobs in this college town. University of Michigan is the largest employer in Ann Arbor. Free educational and entertainment events are consistently offered throughout the town.

9. Miami, Florida

Surrounded by gorgeous beaches, Miami is a great city for work and play. The city boasts a thriving economy and is also surrounded by other job-producing cities, such as West Palm Beach and Fort Lauderdale.

10. San Francisco, California

San Francisco is an attractive city for jobseekers due to its plentiful opportunities in the tech and finance industries.

As you look for the perfect city for work and play, you should consider what matters most to you. These top cities can give you a starting point for finding a job in a location where you will feel happy and satisfied.

Sources:
1. http://www.kiplinger.com/article/real-estate/T006-C000-S002-best-cities-to-live-work-and-play.html
2. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/04/15/top-young-cities-millennials_n_5152929.html

Colleges that Provide Students with the Highest Salaries

May 1st, 2014

Funny parody of student made up of books with glasses holding cash and a diploma

When it comes to earnings potential not all colleges are what they seem.

Most people would think that graduates from Harvard, Stanford or Brown Universities would get the highest paying jobs upon graduation. Interestingly these Universities all actually sit in 8th place on the Pay-Scale Ranking with salaries upon graduation at $61,300; $55,300 and $52,300 respectively. The mid-career median pay for all is $119,000.

The PayScale Ranking for 2013-14 reviewed more than 1,000 schools and 130 majors. According to their research the highest paying Universities were:

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The Most Sought after Jobs and Careers in the USA

December 11th, 2013

Getting on the right career path can be one of the most important decisions you make. Since your career has such a huge impact on your future happiness and earning potential, it makes sense to look for careers that offer you the most potential. While not everyone has the same concept of a “perfect” career, there are a lot of great careers out there that could suit just about anyone. Here, you’ll get a broad overview of some of the most commonly sought-after jobs of the year. It’s a list so diverse that you’re bound to find something that catches your eye.

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